News & Trends
2018-06-14  
 

 

Title: 58% of Botnet Malware Infections Last Under a Day

 

Author: Catalin Cimpanu, Bleeping Computer

 

Date: 21 May 2018

 

Abstract: The vast majority of botnet malware infections last under a day, according to a Fortinet report released last week —the Q1 2018 Threat Landscape Report. The Fortinet data includes information from all types of botnets, targeting desktop, mobile, server, IoT, and networking devices alike. According to the report, the vast majority of botnet infections —58%— last under a day; 17.6% of botnets persist for two days in a row; 7.3% last three days; and so on — while only 5% persist for more than a week.

 

Source: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/58-percent-of-botnet-malware-infections-last-under-a-day/

 

 

2018-06-14  

 

Title: Google Chrome malware alert – malicious software can steal your saved credit card payment details and stored files

 

Author: Saqib Shah, The Sun

 

Date: 21 May 2018

 

Abstract: Users of Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox web browsers should be extra vigilant about their stored credit card details after the discovery of a new malware. The shady software can hoover up saved payment details, passwords and files, warn security researchers from Proofpoint. And the cyber-threat is tipped to "evolve and grow" to target scores of users. The "Vega Stealer" malware infects PCs through phishing emails (which trick you into handing over your details) that seem to be aimed at advertising and marketing professionals. It focuses on scooping your saved payment credentials in Google Chrome – the type of info you may have stored using auto-fill when making an online purchase – and harvesting specific files in Firefox.

 

Source: https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/6342160/google-chrome-malware-credit-card-details-vega-stealer/

 

2018-06-14  
 

 

Title: Roaming Mantis malware expands its reach

 

Author: ITNews

 

Date: 22 May 2018

 

Abstract: Malware called 'Roaming Mantis' that infects smartphones through wi-fi routers is rapidly spreading across the world after first emerging only a couple of months ago. Through DNS hijacking, the malware uses compromised routers to infect Android smartphones and tablets, redirect iOS devices to a phishing site, and run CoinHive, a cryptomining script, on desktops and computers. Having until now mainly affected users in Japan, Korea, China, India and Bangladesh, Roaming Mantis has added two dozen more languages - including Arabic, Russian, and a host of European languages - to aid its spread, according to Kaspersky Lab.

 

Source: https://www.itnews.com.au/news/roaming-mantis-malware-expands-its-reach-491441

 

2018-06-14  
 

Title: A New Reason To Not Buy These Cheap Android Devices: Complimentary Malware

 

Author: Rhett Jones, Gizmodo

 

Date: 25 May 2018

 

Abstract: Researchers at Avast Threat Labs say that more than 100 different low-cost Android devices from manufacturers like ZTE, Archos, and myPhone come with malware pre-installed. Users in more than 90 countries, including Australia, are said to be infected. The good news is there's a fix. According to the report, this adware variant has been in the wild for three years. It's called "Cosiloon" and was first noticed by Dr. Web in 2016. Because it's located in the device's firmware, it's extremely difficult to remove. Avast has detected its presence on 18,000 of its users' devices, so far. Cosiloon has evolved and been updated over the years while largely using the same methods. In one variant, an application is located on the /system partition that downloads a manifest of instructions for which services to start and further downloads. A payload is then installed that serves pop-up ads that your twitchy fingers will likely click inadvertently and could lead to other security issues.

 

Source: https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/05/a-new-reason-to-not-buy-these-cheap-android-devices-complimentary-malware/

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VFAC Review
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2017-01-24
 
The VFAC Review is a bimonthly multi-disciplinary review of the issues and trends in cybercrime.

Issue 12 contains information on:

  • Conferences and Events
  • News & Trends
  • Recent Publications


Articles on:

  • A Geneva Convention or Declaration for Cyberspace
  • Cyber Conflict and Retribution: Uncertainties in the Dark


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Book Review
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2018-04-23
 

Title: Cyberattacks, Cybercrime & Cyberterrorism (Book Chapter of: Handbook of Research on Network Forensics and Analysis Techniques)

 

Authors: Shrivastava, S. & Dube S.

 

Date: 12 January 2018

 

Abstract: This chapter describes how with growing reliance of modern society over internet and web-based services in every nook and corner of our daily lives, the threats of disruption and damage to these services has also evolved at a parallel rate. One of these threats having a potential of severe and life-threatening devastations is ‘Cyberterrorism’. Contrasting to non-lethal terms such as ‘internet vandalism’ and ‘hacktivism’, cyberterrorism encompasses a daunting reach to destruction to the fabric of our modern society. Because of its nature, despite its rapid growth, contrary to conventional terror attacks, cyberterrorism still seems distant from creating a direct threat to civilian life and society. Due to this distance, there is a lack of attention and focus on counter mechanisms against cyberterrorism. By applying effective techniques and keeping out eyes open, establishments can go a long way to avert cyberterrorism attacks and also recover quickly in the occurrence of an attack. The conclusion of this chapter is that additional research is needed to identify the areas in which personal and professional functions on the internet are still vulnerable.

 

Source: https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&lr=&id=md5PDwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA162&dq=cyber+terror&ots=aiyybztsMv&sig=q-_eHkIX7iB-FgrIgj3q32qw09k#v=onepage&q&f=false

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